Hip-hop for a Different Future


Hip Hop

Hip Hop for a Different Future:
Decolonization, Spirituality and Social Transformation

A joint initiative of Hart House, Anti-Racism & Cultural Diversity Office, First Nations House and Multi-Faith Centre for Spiritual Study & Practice

Details: A multi-billion dollar industry, this discussion amongst scholars, activists, and artists aims to situate hip hop culture as an aesthetic, social, cultural and political site for developing knowledge of self and community,  gathering collective strength, generating strategies for resistance and working collaboratively to build different futures.

When: Thurs., Feb. 25, 6:30 pm
Where: East Common Room, Hart House
Cost: Free / Complimentary light refreshments

This event is part of the Hip Hop for a Different Future series >>


About the Panelists

Mark CampbellDr. Mark V. Campbell is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Media and a former Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Regina. Dr. Campbell is a scholar, dj and advocate of the arts, with more than a decade of radio experience with the Bigger than Hip Hop Show. Dr. Campbell is Founding Director at Northside Hip Hop Archive, Canada’s first national hip hop archive and a co-founder of the non-profit arts organization, Nia Centre for the Arts, which celebrates arts from across the African diaspora. Dr. Campbell has been published widely in the Southern Journal of Canadian Studies, Critical Studies in Improvisation, Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society and the CLR Journal of Caribbean Ideas.

Hawa MireHawa Y. Mire is a Master of Environmental Studies candidate in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. Her research pulls from archival histories of resistance and radical curatorial practices, and incorporates traditional Somali stories with discourses of constructed identity. Hawa is also the co-founder of NSOROMMA, a Pan-African arts movement that cultivates creative action and innovation in African communities. Her writing can be found at Jalada Africa, The Feminist Wire, Rabble, Araweelo Abroad. Recently, she co-edited a 2015 special issue of Our Schools, Our Selves titled, “Constellations of Black Radical Imagining: Black Arts and Popular Education” (2015). Her short story series Black Woman, Everybody’s Healer was long listed in 2015 for the Jalada African Literature Prize, and is currently in the process of being written as a book-length manuscript.
Jasiri XJasiri X has worked in under-served communities as a mentor, educator and community leader, and is a founding member of the anti-violence community organization, 1Hood. After garnering over 2 million YouTube views for his conscious elevating Hip-Hop, Jasiri founded 1Hood Media Academy in Pittsburgh, where he leads a team of educators and artists in teaching young people media literacy, photography, videography, music production, creative lyricism, entrepreneurship, journalism and other 21st century skills. Jasiri X is a new millennium Civil Rights Activist working closely with his mentor, Harry Belafonte to address the social ills of today’s society. Recipient of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artist as Activist Fellowship, BMe Fellowship, the August Wilson Center for African-American Culture Fellowship, and most recently selected as a United States Artist fellow.

Kyle Mays
About the Moderator

Dr. Kyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Anishinaabe) is an historian of modern US, Critical Ethnic Studies, and Indigenous Studies. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Transdisciplinary in nature, his work focuses on the construction of indigeneity and its centrality to the development of modern US cities. Dr. Mays is currently completing a book (under contract with SUNY Press) that explores how Indigenous hip hop artists construct identity and challenge colonialism through hip hop culture.


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